All Posts By

Marcia Kadanoff

Maker City partners with Johannesburg for Creative Placemaking

By | Blog, International, localism, Rural | No Comments

Recently, we were asked by Johannesburg Inner City Partnership (JICP) on behalf of the Makers Valley Collective to partner with them on a unique proposal for Creative Placemaking. The proposal was solicited by the U.S. Consulate in Johannesburg and asked for local organizations on the ground to propose work supporting inclusive growth in South Africa: promote conscientious urban revitalization in low-income urban neighborhoods through “creative placemaking” that integrates community-based arts…

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Our visit to Allegany, County New York

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Allegany County is located in upstate New York. This is a small county with a population of not quite 50,000, one with significant assets. A highly skilled population, especially as compared to other rural areas, with a concentration of tradespeople and advanced manufacturing competence The presence of both advanced manufacturing and science-based businesses as well as lower-tech “craft” businesses such as artists and small-scale agriculture Deeply affordable – both in…

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Highlights of the Urban Manufacturing Alliance Gathering in Somerville, MA

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The Urban Manufacturing Alliance (UMA) is one of our key strategic partners. The way we think of them is as the modern incarnation of a trade association.  Their membership consists of ~500 private and public sector players involved in urban manufacturing across about 150 cities and towns in the United States.  Today, most trade associations spend most of their time, money, and energy lobbying at the federal or state level. What…

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Maker Town Hall Microgrants

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We are excited to have worked with the Nation of Makers to pull together this program, which provides microgrants of $500-1000 to Maker advocates. The objective of the program – which is supported by funding NOM received from Cognizant – is to encourage local Maker advocates to pull together the people and organizations that make up the local ecosystem around Making into a Town Hall.  The overarching goal is to…

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The Robots are Coming and What that Means for Cities and Towns

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There is a growing body of thought that the recent U.S. election was as much about robots and automation as anything else. That the reason many metro areas that voted for Obama in 2008 and 2012 flipped to Trump in 2016 came down to fear and anxiety. Fear and anxiety that the robots are coming to replace the few manufacturing and other middle-skilled jobs that still exist inside heartland cities…

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What RI Is Doing to Create Economic Opportunity

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I’m from Rhode Island – if I’m from anywhere that is. (My father was an academic … and the only people who move more than academics are military men and women.) Recently, I had the opportunity to hear Gina Raimondo (D) speak, the innovative and courageous governor of Rhode Island. Governor Raimondo is doing a number of innovative things both to keep talent in Rhode Island and to create talent…

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The Pernicious Effect of the Housing Crisis on Manufacturing Jobs

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The housing crisis of 2007/8 is the very definition of the gift that keeps on giving. A decade later we see that much of the country continues to find it’s mobility negatively affected by the housing crisis. This is a surprising factor that is limiting growth in manufacturing jobs. In the past, if you were a worker in a Manufacturing plant with an advanced skill set and the plant closed,…

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Getting smart about manufacturing in the U.S.

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Some of our friends/partner have written a series of articles on why the Trump administration is going to have a (very) hard time moving the needle with manufacturing jobs. It’s not just that manufacturing jobs have moved to China. There are (at least) three other factors. Automation and the rise of robots to do the low-end work will eliminate many jobs entirely. What economists call “job density” meaning the number…

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